What We See in the Stars – Kelsey Oseid

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Publisher: Ten Speed Press

Publication Date: September 26th, 2017

Page Count: 160 (Hardcover)

About the book:

A richly illustrated guide to the myths, histories, and science of the celestial bodies of our solar system, with stories and information about constellations, planets, comets, the northern lights, and more.

Combining art, mythology, and science, What We See in the Stars gives readers a tour of the night sky through more than 100 magical pieces of original art, all accompanied by text that weaves related legends and lore with scientific facts. This beautifully packaged book covers the night sky’s most brilliant features–such as the constellations, the moon, the bright stars, and the visible planets–as well as less familiar celestial phenomena like the outer planets, nebulae, and deep space. Adults seeking to recapture the magic of youthful stargazing, younger readers interested in learning about natural history and outer space, and those who appreciate beautiful, hand-painted art will all delight in this charming book.

I am blown away by the beauty of this book, starting with the cover, and continuing with the absolutely beautiful illustrations throughout. I’ve always been fascinated by the night sky, and had a telescope at a very young age. What We See in the Stars is a wonderful resource for both children and adults, and makes these topics accessible for any knowledge level.

The book is meticulously organized, beginning with an introduction about where we are in space. That is followed by sections on the constellations, the Milky Way, the Moon, Sun, and planets, as well as asteroids, comets, and meteors, and finally concluding with deep space. Each new section opens with full color, hand painted art depicting the topic to be discussed, and there are additional pieces of art as well as colorful diagrams throughout the book.

The section about constellations, covers Ptolemy’s constellations as well as the Modern constellations and discusses the tools and technologies used to view and study them. Each constellation gets a full page with artwork depicting the actual stars as well as the shape that inspired their name, as well as facts and the history and mythology behind them.

While I very much enjoyed the entire book, The Moon was my favorite section. The artwork was full of dark, rich colors and I could not stop looking at it. This section goes over the different phases of the moon, down to the day, as well as facts about tidal locking and other interesting moon related phenomena. It also talks about all of the different names used to describe a full moon throughout history.

There are so many fun and interesting details throughout this book and I feel like I notice something new every time I flip through it. I cannot wait to share this one with my kids, and I think it would be a really perfect gift for anyone in your life who has an appreciate for space. I will definitely be looking to see what else Kelsey Oseid has created, and if you’re interested, you can read more about her here.

Rating: Screen Shot 2016-03-12 at 10.58.06 PM

I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review. You can read more about the book here.

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September 2017 Wrap-Up

Ahhhhh, it’s FINALLY October! Fall has arrived, and it is unquestionably the best time of the year. Even in Texas, where it’s still seventh circle of hell level hot, I cannot help but be excited about the coming months. But this post is about September, otherwise known around these parts as, “August”, because the weather is still unbearable, the leaves do not change, and we don’t start wearing sweaters until at least November.

September was a pretty average month for reading, totaling out at 9 books completed. There was a whole lot going on at work and at home last month always, so over half of my reading was accomplished through audio books, plus two graphic novels, and two print.

I absolutely loved The Wolf Road and Saga, which I’ve linked my reviews to here. Some of my other favorites from the month were…

Screen Shot 2017-10-05 at 9.25.35 PM.pngCinder (Book 1 of the Lunar Chronicles) is quite possibly the coolest retelling of Cinderella that I’ve ever read. I was quite smitten with Geekerella, which I read earlier this year, but Cinder spoke to the even geekier, scifi loving parts of my brain. In Meyer’s version, Cinderella is a cyborg who lives in a futuristic city known as New Beijing. There are robots, handsome emperors, a terrifying plague with no known cure, and deep rooted tensions with the race of beings that now live on the moon. SO. MUCH. FUN. I listed to the audio version, and Rebecca Soler did an amazing job as always.

 

Screen Shot 2017-10-05 at 9.25.59 PMThe Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue was another audio read. I absolutely fell in love with this story from page one. Percy and Monty have a sweet, tender, playful, slow burn of a love story. There are highway robberies, pirates, hidden passages in sinking islands, and so much more. While being light and fun, the book also touched on more serious topics like family expectation and dysfunction, abuse, and finding your own path in life. Mackenzi Lee is one of my new favorite authors, and I cannot wait to see what she comes out with next.

 

 

Screen Shot 2017-10-05 at 9.25.46 PMI initially downloaded Young Jane Young because I was waiting for my hold of Cress (Book 3 of the Lunar Chronicles) to come through. I had read The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry and really enjoyed it, so I figured I’d give this one a shot and I was not disappointed. While it’s not the best or most exciting book I’ve ever read, it was fun and compelling, and entertaining. Young Jane Young tells the story of Aviva Grossman, a young intern who has an illicit affair with the congressman whose campaign she is working for. The affair comes to light, makes national news, and her reputation, and eventually her life, are utterly destroyed. Rather that admit defeat, Aviva regains control of the situation and makes a new life for herself. The book is told in several parts, each from a different point of view. My favorite is the part told from her daughter’s perspective, as it’s written entirely in the form of (hilarious) emails to her overseas pen pal. This is the book that surprised me the most this month, based on how much I enjoyed it.

The whole line up….

 

Stardust –  4 crowns

Saga Volume 6 – 5 crowns

Saga Volume 7 – 4 crowns

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue – 5 crowns

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo – 4 crowns

Cinder – 5 crowns

The Wolf Road – 5 crowns

Scarlet – 4 crowns

Young Jane Young – 4 crowns

The Wolf Road – Beth Lewis

61GODxCcISL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_Publisher: Crown

Publication Date: July 5th, 2016

Page Count: 368 (Hardcover)

From the Jacket:

Elka barely remembers a time before she knew Trapper.

She was just seven years old, wandering lost and hungry in the wilderness, when the solitary hunter took her in. In the years since then, he’s taught her how to survive in this desolate land where civilization has been destroyed and men are at the mercy of the elements and each other.

But the man Elka thought she knew has been harboring a terrible secret. He’s a killer. A monster. And now that Elka knows the truth, she may be his next victim.

Armed with nothing but her knife and the hard lessons Trapper’s drilled into her, Elka flees into the frozen north in search of her real parents. But judging by the trail of blood dogging her footsteps, she hasn’t left Trapper behind—and he won’t be letting his little girl go without a fight. If she’s going to survive, Elka will have to turn and confront not just him, but the truth about the dark road she’s been set on.

The Wolf Road is an intimate cat-and-mouse tale of revenge and redemption, played out against a vast, unforgiving landscape—told by an indomitable young heroine fighting to escape her past and rejoin humanity.

The Wolf Road drew me in from the first page and had me on the edge of my seat, white knuckled and breathless until I reached the end. Beth Lewis has fully captured my attention with this stunning debut that is unlike anything I’ve ever read. Using stark, simple prose, the story is brilliantly narrated by Elka, a young girl, orphaned and raised in the wild. Set in a series of small gold rush towns where vigilante justice is law, the Wolf Road tells the story of a post apocalyptic world set back to zero after a cold war mistake.

I’ve had this book on my shelves for MONTHS and at this point I cannot remember why I put it off for so long. I finished it last night and just sat there, mouth agape, saying wow over and over until my wife started to look at me funny. This is the third book I’ve read this year, that has been narrated by a young girl and I’m starting to think it’s my new favorite thing. I initially thought i was going to be put off by the style of language she used, but that only lasted for a couple of pages. Elka is one of the most interesting, flawed, and heart breaking characters I’ve ever read.

The story opens with a scene near the end of the book and then makes its way back to it from the beginning. This is a style I particularly enjoy, and it took what was already a quickly moving plot to break neck speeds as I raced to the end both needing to know and desperately not wanting to find out the fates of the characters. It feels odd to say that I enjoyed this book because so much of it is incredibly dark, but I did. So much. And this is one of those books that you could use as a test of character. Recommend it and if the person loves it as much as you, you’ll know you’ve found your people.

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Final Thoughts: If you enjoy post-apoctalyptic fiction but are starting to feel like they’re all sort of the same READ THIS BOOK. It’s full of lush descriptions of nature set against graphic descriptions of the damage caused by the war. The characters are complicated and unforgettable and Lewis has a way of causing visceral reactions that make you wonder how you would handle the same situation. I’ll be waiting with baited breath to read whatever she comes up with next, and you can read more about her here.

Rating: Screen Shot 2016-03-12 at 10.58.06 PM

Favorite Characters: Elka, Penelope, Wolf

Memorable Quotes:

I tried picturing all those places on that map of BeeCee. That’s what we call our country now, just letters of its real name what most people have forgot or don’t care to remember. The map said that old name behind all the scribblings, all the new borders and territories my nana drawn on, but I could only read letters then, not whole words. All I know is that one day all the maps became useless and we had to make our own. The old’uns called that day the Fall or the Reformation. Nana said some down in the far south called it Rapture. Nana was a babe when it happened, said her momma called it the Big Damn Stupid. Set everything back to zero. I never asked why, never much cared. Life is life and you got to live it in the here- now not the back- then. And the here- now for little me was the Thick Woods, with night coming fast.

One a’ them rules is don’t go trusting another man’s path…People do it, they do what their mommies and daddies did, they make them same mistakes, they have them same joys and hurts, they just repeating. Trees don’t grow exactly where their momma is; ain’t no room…I weren’t following no one up through life.

Smell a’ bacon. Ain’t nothing in this world like it. Salt-cured, sliced thick, line a’ juicy fat crisping up in the pan. Anyone what tells you they don’t like bacon is either stupid or lying. Either way that ain’t no one you can trust.

Way I reckon it, men killed more wolves than wolves ever killed men. I know who I’m more afraid of.

I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.